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Above on Bansky in Paris 27 September 2010

Posted by Irish Street Art in International Street Art.
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Above sent IrishStreetArt.com in his most recent stencil from Paris. He told us ‘Last year I was traveling for 3-months around Europe and spent 2 weeks in Paris. One day when I was walking around Paris I found this spot but unfortunately I had just 1 day before my flight to Rome. After observing the large concrete frame on the wall, it gave me a lot of inspiration for several ideas on how to creatively interact with the un-used frame and location. One idea was to juxtapose an “art thief” stealing a popular painting like the Mona Lisa from the frame. I felt the idea and site-specific stencil would interact well with the un-used frame and the fact that the Mona Lisa is located just 10 minutes away inside the Louvre museum.

Time always changes things and with that new situations arise. Since last year when I was in Paris I’ve noticed a lot of new topics in street art and more importantly the thievery of art works in the street. I felt it more interesting and relative to have the art thief portrayed in the stencil stealing a piece of art that actually gets stolen quite often. The English artist Banksy is one of the most popular street artists and highly publicized victims of his street artworks being stolen. It’s not by random chance this happens to Banksy’s art as first and foremost he makes great work but also due to the fact that his indoor works have sold for several hundred thousand dollars you can imagine when he paints outside in the street his works are soon sought after by thieves.

It’s an interesting concept and somewhat of an irony as we the artists and the thieves are both working in an illegal manner. One illegal activity inspires another. The artist paints illegally with spray cans on a wall, while the thieves jack hammer and chip off illegally painted walls, illegally. It’s kind of like the pot calling the kettle black to a degree.
I took the initiative to comment and create a situation in this piece that could mimic both illegal acts simultaneously executed here in the painting and in the process.

Many years ago before Banksy’s mass appeal he painted his popular rat image that read, “Because I’m worthless.” Times have changed Banksy is a common household name as well as the increased value of his artworks. I felt like it would be applicable to the current state of affairs to appropriate his previous statement to “Because now I’m worth it” to reflect the past and current thievery of his street artworks.’

“A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to”
Banksy

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Above the streets of Paris 4 November 2009

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A big thank you to Above who has sent IrishStreetArt.com his most recent work from Paris, France. Above tells us ‘I thought you would enjoy the feeling, “2-D”site specific stencil, and 3-D “arrow kite” installation.’ It definately gets our seal of approval. Click here to go above

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Invader – Pixel King 1 February 2009

Posted by Irish Street Art in Featured Street Artist, International Street Art.
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When asked about a mosaic of pretty tiles in Covent Garden, London recently I decided Invader would have to be featured in irishstreetart.com. Invader works with sqaure tiles to create real life pixelated tributes to his favourite computer game characters. His work is littered across the world’s capitals and I’ve been fortunate enough to see his space invaders in Lonon (photos coming soon), Sydney, Barcelona, Amsterdam and Bangkok. The vimeo feature below is an interview with the frenchman at a recent expo in L.A.

Wiki on Invader:

“He started this project in 1998 with the invasion of Paris – the city where he lives and the most invaded city to date – and then spread the invasion to 35 other cities in the world. Los Angeles, New York City, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Geneva, Tokyo, Prague, Melbourne, Vienna, Bilbao, Bangkok, Darlington, Ljubljana, Barcelona, Amsterdam, Katmandu, Varanasi and even Mombasa are now invaded with his colourful characters in mosaic tiles.

The mosaics depict characters from Space Invaders and other video games from the late 1970s. The images in these games were made with fairly low-resolution graphics, and are therefore suitable for reproduction as mosaics, with tiles representing the pixels. The tiles are difficult to alter and weather-resistant.

Invader installed his first mosaic in the early 1990s in Paris. According to the artist, it was a scout, or sentinel, because it remained the only one for several years. The programme of installations began in earnest in 1998.

The locations for the mosaics are not random, but are chosen according to diverse criteria, which may be aesthetic, strategic or conceptual. Invader favours locations that are frequented by many people, but also likes some more hidden locations. In Montpellier, the locations of mosaics were chosen so that, when placed on a map, they form an image of a space invader character.

The mosaics are built in advance, and Invader travels with them. When he arrives in a city he obtains a map and spends at least a week to install them. They are catalogued, and Invader draws a map indicating their locations within the city. For some time, Invader has employed a professional photographer to take pictures of each mosaic.

One of the more prominent places where the mosaics have been installed is on the Hollywood Sign. The first was placed on the letter D on December 31, 1999. During further trips to Los Angeles, Invader has placed mosaics on other letters of the sign.

Invader also works on another project that he titles “Rubikcubism”, which consists making artworks made of Rubik’s Cubes. Invader has had solo exhibitions at art galleries in Paris, Osaka, Melbourne, Los Angeles, New York City, and London.”

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